Heinkel HE 8
Type
2 - 3 seat reconnaissance floatplane
Engine
a) 1 Armstrong Siddeley Jaguar IV
b)1 Armstrong Siddeley Jaguar VI C
d) 1 Gnôme-Rhône Jupiter
Dimensions
Length 11.65 m, height 4,40 m, span 16,77 m, wing area 47,0 m2
Weights
Empty 1675 kg, loaded 2650 kg
Performance
Max. speed 210 km/h, range 1290 km, service
ceiling 5600 m, rate of climb 2,8 m/sec.
   
Armament
1 forwardfiring 8 mm machine gun, 1 rearward firing 8 mm machinegun, 12 x 0,5 kg bombs
Built by Heinkel
Type
Werk.Nr
Registration
History
a
311
99
Delivered 17/8 1928 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 22/11 1933 after crashlanding near Gothenburg
a
312
98
Delivered 10/9 1928 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored . Destroyed in 1943
a
313
97
Delivered  24/9 1928 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 28/1 1939. Scrapped
a
314
 
Crashed 27/9 1928 during advanced flying. Pilot Stephan von Prondzynski (Chief test pilot at Heinkel) was killed
a
315
96
Delivered 22/10 1928 to 1.Luftflotille. Crashed 22/4 1930 at Warnemünde
a
316
95
Delivered 30/10 1928 to 1.Luftflotille. Crashed 1/10 1935 at Lynetten
a
323
94
Delivered 6/12 1928 to 1.Luftflotille.  Crashed 25/11 1935 at Öresund
The Heinkel HE 8 was a reconnaissance floatplane built in Germany in the late 1920s. It was developed at the request of the Danish Navy, which had noted the success of the HE 5 in Swedish service, and wished to purchase a similar aircraft as well as licensed production as the Orlogsvaerftet HM.II. Apart from its new Armstrong Siddeley engine, the HE 8 also differed from the HE 5 and previous members of the HE 1 family in having a conventional empennage. 22 aircraft were operated until the German invasion in 1940, after which one example was impressed into Luftwaffe, DA+ ?,  service and the remainder placed in storage.
Built by Orlogsværftet, Copenhagen
Type
Werk.Nr
Registration
History
 
O.V.62
93
Delivered 7/8 1929 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 10/10 1938, scrapped
 
O.V.63
92
Delivered 3/9 1929 to 1.Luftflotille. Crashed 18/10 1929 at Falsterbo
 
O.V.64
91
Delivered 13/9 1929 to 1.Luftflotille. Crashed 22/11 1933 at Gothenburg
 
O.V.65
90
Delivered 30/11 1929 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.66
89
Delivered 30/11 1929 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.67
88
Delivered  1/10 1930 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.68
87
Delivered 29/11 1930 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdeawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.69
86
Delivered 20/1 1931 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.70
85
Delivered 21/12 1929 to 1.Luftflotille. Crashed 4/7 at Gilleleje
 
O.V.71
84
Delivered 9/4 1931 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.72
83
Delivered 12/11 1931 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.73
82
Delivered 15/12 1931 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.74
81
Delivered 30/12 1931 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.90
80
Delivered 28/6 1938 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.91
79
Delivered 9/8 1938 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
 
O.V.92
78
Delivered 30/8 1938 to 1.Luftflotille. Withdrawn 9/4 1940, stored. Destroyed 1943
Built by Zmaj, Zemun (Yugoslavia)
d = HE/J
 
301, 192
Tested in the autumn 1931  by the 2. Seaplane Kommando at Split. From 1938 used for target towing (No guns)
at Kumbor. After the German attack it was flown to Greece. Destroyed in May 1941 at Sula Bay, Crete