Focke-Wulf  Fw 47
Type
a Two seat weather
reconnaissance aircraft
B (Prob. not built) Two seat
weather reconnaissance
aircraft
C Two seat weather
reconnaissance aircraft
D Two seat weather
reconnaissance aircraft
E Two seat weather
reconnaissance aircraft
Engine
1 Argus As 10, fixed prop. dia
2.80 m
1 Argus As 10 with
compressor
1 Argus As 10C  , VDM
adjustable pitch prop. dia 2.80
m
1 Argus As 10D or E ,
adjustable pitch prop. dia
2.80 m
1 Argus As 10D or E ,
adjustable pitch prop. dia
2.80 m
Dimensions
Length 10.50 m, span 17.76
m, height 3.04 m, wingarea
35.00 m2
 
Length 10.57 m, span 17.76
m, height 3.04 m, wingarea
35.00 m2
Length 10.57 m, span 17.76
m, height 3.04 m, wingarea
35.00 m2
Length 10.57 m, span
17.76 m, height 3.04 m,
wingarea 35.00 m2
Weights
Empty 950 kg, flying weight
1475 kg, fuel 2 x 75 l
 
Empty 1065 kg, flying weight
1580 kg, fuel 2 x 75 l
Empty 1095 kg, flying weight
1475 kg, fuel 2 x 75 l
 
Performance
Max. speed 172 km/h, landing
speed 77 km/h, required start
length to 20 m 390 m,
required landing field from 20
m 530 m, climb 6.0 min to
1000m - 13.3 min to 2000 m -
34.0 m to 4000 m
 
Max. speed 191 km/h,
cruising speed 175 km/h,
landing speed 76 km/h, climb
4.4 min to 1000 m, range 640
km, service ceiling 5000 m
   
Two seat weather reconnaissance aircraft designed by Wilhelm Bansemir in 1932.
Used at the following Wetterflugstelle : Hamburg, Berlin, Köln, Essen, Königsberg, München, Gablingen, Norderney, Kiel, Rotenburg
Used up to WW II , but demand for a bigger plan with a crew of 3 forced these planes out of service. Some were used in some Segelfluggruppen , others  were  kept as back ups at the Wetterflugstellen. According to Nowarra 2 planes survived WW II
Number built :
35 version C,D,E from 1934 to 1936, 1 E  built in 1939 ( Enno Springmann )
1 prototype, 9 C, 11 D ( Heinz J. Nowarra )
The Focke-Wulf A.47 FOR METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS (Flight)

Specifically for meteorological observations, the Focke-Wulf monoplane shown here is  not a high-performance machine, but an endeavour has been made to make it very stable, so that when much cloud-flying has to be done, as must often be the case, the machine is easy to fly " blind." Good climb and a high ceiling were considered more important than speed, and in fact a high speed was regarded as a definite disadvantage, since it might, on occasion, lead to the machine getting too far away from its starting point during an altitude flight in the clouds.
The construction of the A.47 is the usual Focke-Wulf, with a one-piece wing of all-wood construction, and a welded steel tube fuselage. The wing tips show the Zanonia form associated with all Focke-Wulf machines, and which has been found by this firm to give added lateral stability. The wing is carried on steel tube pyramids well above the fuselage.
The engine fitted in the A.47 is the new Argus As. 10, an eight-cylinder Vee inverted air cooled, with direct airscrew drive. Later it is proposed to fit a supercharged engine of the same make.
An unusually extensive equipment of instruments is carried, partly for making meteorological observations, and partly to enable the crew to fly " blind " for considerable periods.
The main dimensions of the Focke- Wulf A.47 are as follows:
Length o.a., 10.5 m. (34 ft. 6 in.) ; wing span, 17.76 m. (58 ft. 3 in.) ; wing area, 35 m.2 (377 sq. ft.). The tare weight is 950 kg. (2,090 lb.), and the disposable load 525 kg. (1,155 lb.), giving a gross weight of 1,476 kg. (3,245 lb.), a wing loading of 42,2 kg. /m.2 (8,62 lb./sq. ft.) and a power loading of 6.7 kg./h.p. (14.75 l b . / h . p . ).
The maximum speed at ground level is 172 km./h. (107 m.p.h.), and the landing speed 77 km./h. (48 m.p.h.). The climb to 4,000 m. (13,100 ft.) takes 34 minutes. The best gliding angle is given as 1 in 10.8.
The instrument equipment is unusually extensive. Below and to the right of the wheel can be seen the oil temperature control handle