Farman F.223.3
The F.223 (redesignated NC.223 when Farman was absorbed into SNCAC) incorporated significant changes, including a twin tail and a considerably refined fuselage. The first prototype was ordered as a long range mail plane and in October 1937 established a record by flying 621 miles with a 22,046 lb payload. The Ministere d l'Air ordered a production run of 8 of the NC223.3 variation which was commenced in 1939. A variant NC 223.4 Jules Verne of Naval Aviation French was the first Allied bomber to raid Berlin: on the night of 7 June 1940 aircraft of this variant dropped eight bombs of 250 kg and 80 of 10 kg weight on the German capital. This operation, which was of a primarily psychological-warfare nature, was repeated three days later.
The first NC 223.3 bombers were delivered on May 1940 and participated in night bombing attacks on Germany before being transferred to North Africa in June 1940. The bombers were subsequently relegated to transport roles, seeing service with both the Vichy regime and the Free French.
Type 5-seat night bomber rebuilt as a transport
Engine 4 Hispano Suiza 12Y29
Dimensions Length  21,90 m, height 5,05 m ,  span 33,40 m , wing area 131,10 m2  ,
Weights Empty 10535 kg, loaded  , max. take off weight  19175 kg
Performance Max.. speed 350 km/h at 4000 m , cruising speed 280 km/h , range 2400 km, endurance  , service ceiling 7850 m  , climb 13 min. 30 sec. to 4000 m
Armament (1 machine-gun MAC 34 of 7.5mm in carriage on the nose, 1 cannon HS 404 of 20mm in dorsal turret, 1 cannon HS 404 of 20mm in ventral turret
4185 Kg of bombs in bomb bay )
Type Werk.Nr Registration History
A 10 F-BAAG Crashed on January 18, 1943 during a test flight to Francazal by a Luftwaffe pilot. The Germans lost interest in the plane and asked to recover usable pieces
A 9 F-BAGR It was sent to Bourget on February 5, 1943.
  8 F.BAFR Taken into account. in Toulouse by the DLH and delivered June 15, 1943 to Bourget by Codos.It was assigned to the Versuch-Verband Obdl, It was damaged in Salonica on September 4, 1943.
The N.C.223.3, as a derivative of the Farman F.220 plane model, looks strikingly similar to the F.222.2 bomber, yet different as well. The biggest difference is the twin rudder on the tail that helps improve stability and yaw control. The plane's overall design was also made more aerodynamic as part of the improvement, the nose section is made a tad shorter, and the plane uses Hispano-Suiza 12Y-29 engines rather than the previous Gnome Rhone model. Defense armaments were also improved with two Hispano cannons as the rear ventral and dorsal turret armament.
The N.C.223.3 is made distinctive with its push-pull engine configuration, stacking the engine on each side in tandem for the effect where the forward engine "pulls" the plane while the rear engine "pushes" the plane. This lowered the amount of engines having to protrude from the wing, while keeping the engine centerline so that one failed engine in a side will not prevent the other to provide a similar thrust force.
In early 1943, Lufthansa signed a contract forcing Air France to lease some of its aircraft. On the other hand, in application of the decision of the Armistice Commission of 9 June 1943 pronouncing the seizure of the remainder of the material not included in the lease,
There were three Farman / NC-223.3 four-engine aircraft. The first of them, No. 10 F-BAAG was crashed on January 18, 1943 during a test flight to Francazal by a Luftwaffe pilot. The Germans lost interest in the plane and asked to recover the usable pieces
No. 9 F-BAGR was sent to Bourget on February 5, 1943. It was followed a few months later by No. 8 F-BAFR, taken into account. in Toulouse by the DLH and delivered June 15, 1943 to Bourget by Codos. They were both supported by the Luftwaffe. Their German career remains unknown, but No. 8 allegedly bore a German civil registration. He was assigned to the Versuch-Verband Obdl, It was damaged in Salonica on September 4, 1943.